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Vaccine for treating cancer made possible using Oxford COVID vaccine technology

Research from the University of Oxford and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research has shown that the technology behind the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine has potential in treating cancer

Scientists from the University of Oxford and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research are building on the success of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 to develop a vaccine to treat cancer. Researchers have designed a two-dose therapeutic cancer vaccine using Oxford’s viral vector vaccine technology.

When tested in mouse tumour models, the cancer vaccine increased the levels of anti-tumour T cells infiltrating the tumours and improved the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Compared to immunotherapy alone, the combination with the vaccine showed a greater reduction in tumour size and improved the survival of the mice.

The study, which was done by Professor Benoit Van den Eynde’s group at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of Oxford in collaboration with co-authors Professor Adrian Hill and Dr Irina Redchenko at the University’s Jenner Institute, has been published in the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website